The Magic Feather: The Magic Is Inside You! Speaking By Heart

November 26, 2012 at 7:14 pm | Posted in The Magic Feather | Leave a comment

What do you think of when someone asks  you to “say it by heart?”  Most would say memorize exactly what you’ve written! Yes? That certainly takes the heart out of speaking your words. Memorization creates a great deal of pressure to say the exact words you’ve written.

Memorization combined with nervousness and fear of forgetting can lead to a total brain freeze; a breakdown of words that flee from you in terror – no matter how hard you try to remember. Ever happen to You? You’re not alone.

What can You do to remember those eloquent words you’ve spun?

1)  Don’t Memorize

Thoughts in and of themselves are not memorable – without emotion. Think about a favorite song, the lyrics that you’ve committed to memory. If not sung, the words go flat; you may even forget some of the words; the emotion lost. The same thing happens when you memorize. If you are memorizing,  you are only recalling words. The pathos behind your words lie fallow – with no life.

2)  Don’t Write Word for Word

If speaking from notes, write key words and phrases. If your notes become a written document you will try to read or lift from your page every word you have written; a sure way to lose the attention of your listeners.

Use key words to prompt the continuation of your thoughts. Your speaking style will come across more relaxed – more conversational – more effective.

3)  Don’t Undermine Your Knowledge

Who knows your topic, your reason for speaking on your subject better than you. If you feel you don’t and your listeners know more:

• Put a new spin on the subject

• Stay current; up-to-date on the topic

• Speak for the experience

• Be passionate – above all!

4)  Don’t Think Only In Words

American author, Mark Twain, was one of the first to devise a system of remembering his speeches. A haystack with a wiggly line under it to represent a rattlesnake would remind him to begin talking about ranch life in the west.

He would draw a picture of each section of his speech, all strung out in a row.

Then he would look at them and destroy them. When he spoke, the row of images was sharp in his mind. He never needed to consult notes. The system was so good that he could recall speeches given 25 years earlier.

Twain was employing a feature of memory that has since been confirmed by research that – images are more memorable than words.

The capacity of memory for pictures may be almost unlimited. In experiments, people shown up to 10,000 pictures could later select those they had seen from among unfamiliar ones with remarkable accuracy. Many people dismiss these mnemonic techniques which depend on imagery. 

Think In Pictures! Not Just Words!

Any great photo-journalist will tell you, “that a picture is worth a thousand words!”

Remember:

                           Own The Words and Images – Make Them Yours! 

                                           Speak Them From The Heart!

      

      

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